HPV
Viruses

Author: Gianpiero Pescarmona
Date: 21/11/2007

Description

DEFINITION

The disease definition according to a specific consensus conference or to The Diseases Database based on the Unified Medical Language System (NLM)

Also the link to the corresponding Mesh term has to be created

DatabaseLink
WikipediaFabry
The Diseases DatabaseURL
MedlinePlus"URL":
OMIM single geneFabry
WikigenesAGAL
GeneCards"AGAL":
Kegg PathwayAGAL

Se ci sono più voci su OMIM usare questo formato di ricerca:

Autism

EPIDEMIOLOGY

age, sex, seasonality, etc

SYMPTOMS

DIAGNOSIS

histopathology
radiology
NMR
laboratory tests

PATHOGENESIS

HPV invasion

HPV Invasion + caption

Fulltext

Unique Strains of SV40 in Commercial Poliovaccines from 1955 Not Readily Identifiable with Current Testing for SV40 Infection

PATIENT RISK FACTORS

Vascular

Genetic

Acquired

Hormonal

Genetic

Acquired

TISSUE SPECIFIC RISK FACTORS

anatomical (due its structure)

vascular (due to the local circulation)

physiopathological (due to tissue function and activity)

COMPLICATIONS

THERAPY

Treatment of recalcitrant periungual warts with cimetidine in pediatrics.2010 Chern E, Cheng YW.J Dermatolog Treat. 2010 Sep;21(5):314-6.

Viral warts, caused by human papilloma virus (HPV), are commonly seen in dermatology clinics. However, treatment for warts can be challenging, and there is no single method of treatment that is universally effective. Conventional therapies involve the physical destruction of lesions, including cryotherapy, electrodesiccation, CO2 laser, and topical keratolytic agents. Successful treatment of recalcitrant warts, especially periungual lesions and verruca plana of the face, had been limited with the conventional modalities. These painful procedures resulting in poor compliance, cosmetic disfiguration, and residual indolent lesions usually led to incomplete treatment. Use of high-dose cimetidine in the treatment of viral warts has been reported in the literature in recent years; however, with conflicting results. Herein, we present a 12-year-old girl with recalcitrant periungual warts, successfully treated with cimetidine for 4 months without subsequent recurrence and side effects.

Infection With Human Papillomavirus Alters Expression of the Small Proline Rich Proteins 2 and 3, 2004

Human papillomavirus (HPV) does not induce lysis of infected keratinocytes, and the exact
mechanisms of viral escape are not known. As keratinocytes differentiate, the cornified cell
envelope (CCE) develops, providing a protective barrier to the host. Our prior studies have
identified abnormalities in CCEs isolated from genital epithelium infected with HPV 11 (a lowrisk HPV type) and HPV 59 (a high-risk HPV type).
These abnormalities included reduced thickness and increased fragility compared to CCEs
in healthy epithelium. Transcription of loricrin is also reduced in HPV 11- and 59-infected epithelium. In this study, uninfected and HPV 11- or 59-infected human genital epithelium were examined for expression of the small proline rich proteins (SPRs), which serve as cross-linking proteins within the CCE. Limiting cycle RT-PCR was performed to detect the various SPR transcripts in HPV 11- and 59-infected, or uninfected epithelium. Immunohistochemical analysis and immunoblot assays were performed to analyze the distribution and quantity of SPR2A, SPR2B, and SPR3. SPR2B transcripts were moderately increased in the HPV 11- and 59-infected tissues and SPR3 transcripts were significantly increased in HPV 11-infected tissues and minimally increased in HPV 59-infected tissues. SPR2B protein quantities were moderately increased while SPR2A was not significantly changed.
SPR3 protein, while not present in uninfected epithelium, was detected in abundance in HPV
11-infected tissue. We conclude that low-risk and high-risk HPVs share the ability to alter expression of CCE proteins, although the exact mechanisms may differ. Expression of individual SPRs differed between these types and these alterations may play a role in fragility of CCEs in HPV infection

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